Frequently Asked Questions

Your dues are drawn from a formula established in 1941 by Justice Irvin Rand. Deemed “the Rand Formula”, this formula draws a reasonable portion of dues from a members pay to support the operations of their local.

This ruling also established, that while a member pays dues, they cannot be forced to take an oath and be initiated into their union against their will. Therefore, they must choose to willingly initiate into their local.

Any member in good standing, and having attended __ general meetings in the last __ months, may stand for election to join the executive board.

Any member in good standing, that has meant the attendance requirements, may stand for election to be a member of a committee. Previously, members were selected by the executive board and then approved by the general membership. Now, the membership directly elects it’s committee members.

Any member in good standing may apply to be a shop steward. To apply you must receive signatures from the members of your workplace, to endorse your application. 

After being accepted as a shop steward, you will be expected to take training through CUPE workshops to learn the fundamentals of being a shop steward, and how to represent members in your area.

For City of Edmonton employees, a notice of investigation is one of the earliest steps in the formal discipline system. This is an important step, as discipline is often the outcome of these meetings. We strongly advise that members visit the (request a rep)[link] to find their nearest trained shop steward and fill out a request a rep form.

A Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) is work contract that has been agreed upon by the union on behalf of all members of the bargaining unit. As the exclusive representative of the bargaining unit, the union has the authority to speak with one voice. Making our bargaining power stronger, than if we had bargained by ourselves.

It depends on your bargaining unit. The best way to find out is through the regularly posted bargaining updates made by your committee. 

Bargaining bulletins are posted in the (bargaining)[link] section of the website. These are posted regularly by your bargaining committee to update you on their progress. Your committee will also make reports at general meetings to update members on their progress.

A grievance is a formal claim that a portion of the collective agreement has been violated.

CUPE Local 30 is fortunate enough to have the resources to employee full time labour relations officers (business agents) whose purpose is to handle grievances on behalf of the union. The union hires these agents based on their experience in labour relations and trade unionism. Should your work issue escalate to the need for a grievance, your business agent will work with you to navigate the process.

While the grievance is one of the most definitive ways to address a perceived breach of the collective agreement. 

The union often attempts to address workplace issues at the lowest possible level before escalating to a formal grievance. If you have a problem in your workplace, we advise that you first consult with your job site’s shop steward. Shop stewards will then be able to help direct you to the right resources.

At CUPE 30, our policy is to “work now grieve later” unless the work presents a risk to your health and safety. We advise members to work constructively with their supervisors when possible. If you are asked to perform outside your job description, we ask that you document the event, according to this linked form, and inform your area [shop steward](link). Your shop steward will be able to help direct you to the necessary resources. By documenting events such as this, we will be able to build a stronger case, should the need for a grievance arise. 

Disclaimer: The information provided on this website does not, and is not intended to, constitute legal advice; instead, all information, content, and materials available on this site are for general educational purposes only.